Salisbury Golf & Learning Center

Eisenhower Park
East Meadow, NY 11554
(516) 222-2620

Custom Club Fitting

 

“Would you by shoes without trying them on?”


If you don’t know your personal equipment specification, you may be robbing yourself of the opportunity to optimize your swing technique. Our staff of PGA professionals can help you determine key factors such as lie angle, shaft flex, shaft length, set composition and grip size. With the aid of our state of the art club-fitting units and computer aided launch monitors, we can provide you with “portable” specifications, which you can take with you to purchase your new clubs. If you elect to buy your clubs in our proshop, we will deduct the cost of the fitting session ($50) from the price of your clubs. Virtually all of the current models of clubs can be ordered to match your swing measurement.



“Touring pros play fitted clubs – no matter which brand sponsors them. They know the surest way to wreck a grooved swing is to play poorly fitted clubs. A poorly fitted club will punish a good swing with a bad shot. Properly fitted clubs reward good swings with good shots. Fitted clubs help you swing better – it’s as simple as that, whether you’re an amateur or a pro.”

Peter Jacobsen, P.G.A. Tour player


Custom Fitting at The ProShop At Eisenhower

  • By appointment (preferred) or walk-in

  • Conducted by PGA professional staff

  • Outdoor fitting on the range

  • Fitting carts for all major club manufacturers

  • High tech fitting tools, computer assisted launch monitors, etc.

Schedule you custom club fitting by contacting a ProShop representative.


Technical Considerations

Advances in computer technology, high speed photography, and materials research have given designers new information on golf club performance. This information has revolutionized not only the science of golf club design but also the art of club fitting. While there are objective criteria which are helpful in choosing the correct golf clubs the subjective factors of personal comfort and confidence are at least as important.

Club fitting can be thought of as a combination of four factors: shaft flex, shaft length, lie angle and loft. Keep in mind that these factors are often inter-related.

Shaft Flex

The shaft flex is the indication of how much swing forces is necessary to make the shaft perform properly. If the shaft is too stiff, the player will have difficulty flexing it during the swing. This may result in reduced distance and shots going to the right. If the shaft is too flexible, the player may have difficulty controlling the club head.  This may result in either sliced or hooked shots. Correct shaft flex is primarily determined by the club head speed generated by the player. As a general rule the following applies.

The shaft flex is the indication of how much swing forces is necessary to make the shaft perform properly. If the shaft is too stiff, the player will have difficulty flexing it during the swing. This may result in reduced distance and shots going to the right. If the shaft is too flexible, the player may have difficulty controlling the club head.  This may result in either sliced or hooked shots. Correct shaft flex is primarily determined by the club head speed generated by the player. As a general rule the following applies.
 

 
Driver Swing Speed Distance of 5-Iron Shaft Flex
> 60 MPH < 125 Yds Ladies Light
60-70 MPH 125-140 Yds Ladies
70-80 MPH 140-150 Yds Seniors
80-90 MPH 155-170 Yds Regular
90-100 MPH 170-185 Yds Stiff
>100 MPH >185 Yds X-Stiff

While this chart is a good guide, the player's swing tempo and particular requirements should be considered. Players who achieve a given club head speed with a slower tempo should consider a more flexible shaft than indicated above. Players who have faster shorter harder swings should consider stiffer shafts than indicated.  Players with accuracy problems should usually move toward stiffer shafts. Players seeking to maximize distance or club head feel should look for a more flexible shaft.

Most golf clubs are available in a choice of five flexes:

  • Regular (or Medium)
  • Stiff (or Firm)
  • X-Stiff (or Strong)
  • Senior (or Light)
  • Ladies

Complicating matters, many manufacturers have their own name for these flexes.

Shaft Length

Shaft length is measured from the top of the grip straight down the shaft to the sole of the club head. The length effects distance, accuracy, and swing plane. Thus, shaft length is both a matter of personal fit and individual performance preference.

Changing the length of the club has three major effects:

Increasing or decreasing the shaft length changes the length of the swing arc, just as changing the radius of a circle changes its circumference. As long as a player swings at the same tempo and is strong enough to handle a longer club, a longer shaft will will give more club head speed and distance.

Changing the shaft length changes the plane of the golfer's swing. The golf swing takes place on a plane formed by the golfer's shoulders and the ball at address. When a longer golf club is used, the golfer must stand further from the ball. Thus the plane is "flatter", or closer to horizontal. When a shorter club is used the golfer must stand closer to the ball and the plane is more "upright" or vertical. Generally an upright swing is more accurate since the club face is aligned with the target for a longer time in the swing. A flatter swing, however is more powerful for many players.

The longer shaft changes the position of the club head at impact. Because the golfer is standing further from the ball, the heel of the club head will move downward and the toe will move upward.

 

Wood Length
Driver 44.0"
2 43.5"
3 43.0"
4 42.5"
5 42.0"
7 41.5"
9 41.0"
11 41.0"
   
   
   
 
Iron Length
1 39.75"
2 39.25"
3 38.75"
4 38.25"
5 37.75"
6 37.25"
7 36.75"
8 36.25"
9 37.75
PW 35.25"
SW 35.25"
 

Standard men's length for most manufacturers is indicated to the left. Standard ladies length is 1" shorter. Standard seniors is 1" longer.

 These measurements have proven to be optimal for people of average height and arm length (about 5'10" men who wear a 34" sleeve dress shirt). Interestingly, people up to 4" taller or shorter usually do not need different length clubs.

Lie Angle

The lie angle of a club is the angle formed by the sole of the club and the shaft. This angle effects the position of the club head at address and at impact. Proper lie will cause the center of the club head to strike the ground rather than the heel or toe.

 
     
 

A club which is too upright for the golfer will hit the ground with the heel. This will tend to cause a pull or hook because the face tends to close through the hitting area and because the face is actually aiming to the left (for right-handed players).

     

A club which is too flat will hit the ground with the toe. This generally causes a push or slice since the face will open and is already aiming right (for right-handed players). Clubs that are too upright or too flat also cause decreased distance since the twisting of the club head at impact absorbs energy.

 

Correct lie angle is a function of shaft length. The longer the club, the more flatter the lie angle should be. The shorter the club, the more upright the lie angle should be. While the best way of determining correct lie angle is the driving range, the following chart is a good indication.

Wrist to ground Correct lie angle
31" 3 deg flat
32" 2 deg flat
33" 1 deg flat
34" Standard
35" 1 deg up
36" 2 deg up
37" 3 deg up
 

Distance from the wrist to the ground when wearing ordinary street shoes.

Approximately 25% of golfers will benefit by ordering golf equipment which is flatter or more upright than standard.

Loft

The loft of a golf club is the angle formed by the face of the club and the shaft. The loft effects the trajectory the golf ball will travel after impact and the distance the ball will carry. In irons and fairway woods the loft is usually a matter of club design. In the driver however, the loft must fit the golfer's swing.

Three factors determine optimal loft for a driver:

  • Club head speed: The greater the club head speed the more backspin is imparted to the ball and less loft is required for best trajectory.

  • Swing consistency: Decreasing loft also increases the side spin associated with impact with face open or closed. It is therefore harder to control a low-lofted driver.

  • The material and design of the head also effect optimal loft. It is therefore incorrect that if a given loft is right in one model that it will be right in another. For instance, it si common for golfers to require 1 to 2 degrees less loft with the new titanium drivers.

Since control is always more important than distance, it is advisable to err in the direction of extra loft.



 


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